Wilson rooms

Wilson Palace boutique hotel has been renovated to 5-star standard – we can follow Štefánikova Street’s history as a sumptuous boulevard of the representative class, palaces belonging to wealthy citizens and aristocracy from the turn of the 19th - 20th centuries. After the end of First World War, Bratislava was known as Wilson’s Town for a short time. This was in honour of the-then American president Woodrow Wilson who had supported Slovak and Czech efforts towards freedom and democracy. 
 
 
Executive Room  

Executive Room

Luxury Double room in palace style. 

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Junior Suite  

Junior Suite

Attic rooms for two adults with sofa bed for two children. Baby cot on request.


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Deluxe Junior Suite  

Deluxe Junior Suite

Spacious high-ceilinged apartments for two people.

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2 Bedroom Suite  

2 Bedroom Suite

The most luxurious part of the hotel has two bedrooms with own bathrooms, connected with a lounge and entrance area. 

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Room amenities include:
  • free, daily refilled minibar
  • bottle of wine at arrival
  • coffee maker Francis Francis with free Illy coffee and tea,
  • iron and ironing board
  • bathrobe and slippers
  • free wifi,
  • LCD TV,
  • safe (laptop size),
  • air-conditioning
  • hair dryer.

Brief history
The historical building was built in 1881 at the request of Vojtech Tauscher, the town’s main doctor. He was also the doctor of Bratislava’s court of Fridrich Habsburg, the deputy for Prešporok, the children’s hospital founder, and a noted alpinist. The palace was built in eclectic style as reflected in the fine adornments with renaissance–baroque and rococo elements. The interior decoration was similarly striking. The 1930s and 1940s saw reconstruction, with the loggia on the western side being closed (now an apartment lounge).  
The building has been a national cultural monument since 1963. The next renovation was 1978 – 1980 to accommodate the headquarters of the Women’s Association, which remained in the building until 1989. The window pane at the staircase is by artist Kveta Gandlová (1926 - 2004).